Quantcast

Video of the Day

Masthead

Editor-in-Chief
Alex Carnevale
(e-mail/tumblr/twitter)

Managing Editor
Kara VanderBijl
(e-mail/tumblr/twitter)

Features Editor
Mia Nguyen
(e-mail/tumblr/twitter)

Senior Editor
Durga Chew-Bose
(e-mail/tumblr/twitter)

Senior Editor
Brittany Julious
(e-mail/tumblr/twitter)

This Recording

is dedicated to the enjoyment of audio and visual stimuli. Please visit our archives where we have uncovered the true importance of nearly everything. Should you want to reach us, e-mail alex dot carnevale at gmail dot com, but don't tell the spam robots. Consider contacting us if you wish to use This Recording in your classroom or club setting. We have given several talks at local Rotarys that we feel went really well.

Pretty used to being with Gwyneth

Regrets that her mother did not smoke

Frank in all directions

Jean Cocteau and Jean Marais

Simply cannot go back to them

Roll your eyes at Samuel Beckett

John Gregory Dunne and Joan Didion

Metaphors with eyes

Life of Mary MacLane

Circle what it is you want

Not really talking about women, just Diane

Felicity's disguise

Live and Active Affiliates
Search TR


follow us in feedly

Classic Recordings
Robert Altman Week

Monday
Mar072011

« In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature »

Our Novels, Ourselves

This Thursday, This Recording unveils our list of the 100 Greatest Novels. This will likely be the final word on the subject, and a key to the city will be presented to us in the shape of a novel. In order to broaden our horizons, we asked a group of talented young writers and artists to name their favorite novels. This is the first in a three part series.

Part One (Tess Lynch, Karina Wolf, Elizabeth Gumport, Sarah LaBrie, Isaac Scarborough, Daniel D'Addario, Elisabeth Donnelly, Lydia Brotherton, Brian DeLeeuw)

Part Two (Alice Gregory, Jason Zuzga, Andrew Zornoza, Morgan Clendaniel, Jane Hu, Ben Yaster, Barbara Galletly, Elena Schilder, Almie Rose)

Part Three (Alexis Okeowo, Benjamin Hale, Robert Rutherford, Kara VanderBijl, Damian Weber, Jessica Ferri, Britt Julious, Letizia Rossi, Will Hubbard, Durga Chew-Bose, Rachel Syme, Amanda McCleod, Yvonne Georgina Puig)

Tess Lynch

In the Lake of the Woods by Tim O'Brien

This is a book about Vietnam. Please, sit down. Come on, it isn't really about Vietnam, it's about – just sit down for one second – the clashing of public and private life, when the demon-like personifications of every horrible thing you've ever done wage war with whatever good parts of you still exist; the plot consciously implodes on itself, leaving you feeling psychologically fractured and with nightmares about killing your houseplants with boiling water while screaming "Kill Jesus," just like you've always wanted.

Chilly Scenes of Winter by Ann Beattie

Ignore the movie please. This was Beattie's first novel, and my favorite of hers, not only because there's a character in it who spends all of her time in the bathtub like I do, and not only because Sam is the fictional hot best friend I projected any and all fantasies onto during my formative years, but because it's a quiet study of the electrically-charged feeling of being in love operative-word-hopelessly. The desserts she cooked that you miss, the radio songs, the happy hour beers spent bumming. Too true, Ann, too true.

Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov

You know what? Fuck Lolita. I take that back, don't fuck Lolita, she's too young, plus I loved that book. I loved this one more, though. The poem makes me disintegrate with feelings. I'd get all 999 lines tattooed on my face, but then I'd never be able to work in corporate America. John Shade's poem can be a bit of a downer ("how many more/Free calendars shall grace the kitchen door?"), so fictional editor Charles Kinbote comes in to offer up some zippy commentary from the imaginary land of Zembla. I thought Kinbote was supposed to make me feel better, that that was his purpose, but apparently Nabokov, in an interview, mentioned that Kinbote killed himself after publishing the manuscript. God, what a downer. I wish I'd never heard that bit of imaginary news; maybe there's no point to anything and I should go ahead and get that tat, do you think it would be pretty sickkk?

The Stand by Stephen King

This is my favorite Stephen King novel, and that's saying a lot, since I never leave the bookstore without some SK representation. The Stand is so long that if you get the uncut edition, you can step up onto it and get the bird's nests off your roof; even still, you feel depressed when you turn the last page. There's nothing like a story that begins with the end of most of humanity and then continues for about 1100 pages, peppered with the lyrically satisfying name Trashcan Man and lots of details about stomachs exploding. Life is gross. Books can be gross. You didn't want to finish those nachos anyway.

Tess Lynch is a writer living in Los Angeles. You can find her website here.

Karina Wolf

Melmoth the Wanderer by Charles Maturin

These days, Melmoth the Wanderer is more an allusion than a perused text. Nabokov named Humbert Humbert’s automobile after the damned nomad; Oscar Wilde took "Melmoth" as a pseudonym, perhaps because of his shared status as eternal outsider. Maturin’s 1820 gothic novel begins with a bequest – a young Trinity student inherits his uncle’s estate and a manuscript, which relates the tale of his ancestor Melmoth, who extended his life by 150 years, presumably by selling his soul to the Devil. The only out from damnation is to find someone to take over the pact. The novel consists of a rococo series of nested vignettes, wherein characters encounter the cursed wanderer, sometimes peripherally. The pleasure (and challenge) of the text is in its stylish excesses.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

I re-visited Wuthering Heights when I taught at hokwan, a Korean cram school that aimed to stuff as many five dollar words possible into the minds of the foreign-born students. The odd task of reading Brontë’s novel aloud to a teenage boy (who loved it) made me appreciate its ingenious storytelling along with its elemental feelings. As a child, Brontë endured the deaths of two sisters and in response created Gondal, a detailed imaginary world that she sustained in letters and stories from adolescence to adulthood. Wuthering Heights retains a similarly corrective power; the novel is less a romance than a psychic outcry and self-assertion.

The Witches by Roald Dahl

The best children’s books are clever rejoinders to the early onset of life, primers for how to deal. Roald Dahl’s The Witches retains the violent menace of early fairy tales while offering readers a wry (and controversial) antidote to vanquishing the enemy, a kind of mass witch transformation and cat-led genocide. Dahl retains his spiky humor and incorrectness – also, his irresistibly charming prose. With lovely line drawings by Quentin Blake.

Karina Wolf is a writer living in New York. Her book The Insomniacs is forthcoming from Penguin. You can find her website here.

Elizabeth Gumport

I am too adrift from myself to know what my favorite novels are. If I could tell you that, I could tell you so many things! But like rats fleeing a sinking ship, my former selves keep escaping me. One of the few things I am sure of these days is that I am twenty-five years old, and so like a child I go around insisting on my age. But we can forgive a child for identifying herself by how old she is, since what else would she have done with those months and years except live them? I, on the other hand, ought to have more and deeper moorings. Instead, the first page of D.H. Lawrence’s St. Mawr looks like a mirror: "Lou Witt had had her own way so long, that by the age of twenty-five she didn't know where she was. Having one's own way landed one completely at sea."

Reading St. Mawr, the feeling I had was not of identifying with the character but of being identified by them. I did not “find”myself. I was found, as if by a carrier pigeon bearing a note. A few months later, it was The Wings of the Dove that saw me: James writes that Kate Croy “had reached a great age for it quite seemed to her that at twenty-five it was late to reconsider, and her most general sense was a shade of regret that she hadn't known earlier. The world was different--whether for worse or for better – from her rudimentary readings, and it gave her the feeling of a wasted past. If she had only known sooner she might have arranged herself more to meet it.”

My sense of being “found”by these books was heightened by how I happened to read them: St. Mawr did in fact arrive for me by air, in a package from Amazon. It was a gift from a friend – the same friend who several months later would be the one to recommend The Wings of the Dove. A truly personal recommendation shows you something you don't often see, which is the way you hold yourself out to the world. That is what Lord Mark offers Milly Theale in The Wings of the Dove, when he shows her “the beautiful” Bronzino portrait “that’s so like” her. What matters is not merely what you are like, but that you are like something – that the world knows what you look like, even when you don’t. When shown the portrait, Milly admits she doesn’t see the resemblance.

Knowing that a book exists is one thing, being made to recognize its existence by someone else another. It is the fact of Lord Mark’s showing her the portrait, and not the portrait itself, that so topples Milly: “It was perhaps as a good a moment as she should have with any one, or have in any connexion whatever.”A personal recommendation is not the same as one cast out to anonymous strangers on the internet.

I will try, therefore, to be as specific as possible: if you are my age, self-absorbed, and aimless but not hopeless, you should read these books immediately. Perhaps the figure sketched in them will impress you as your own, and perhaps it will resolve something for you. Sometimes books enter your life at exactly the right moment. It doesn't happen as often as you'd think: like people, they tend to appear too early, when you are too foolish to appreciate them, or too late, when they have been claimed by someone else.

Elizabeth Gumport is a writer living in New York.

Isaac Scarborough

Tigana by Guy Gavriel Kay

Amongst all of the fantasy novels I devoured as an adolescent, Tigana is the only that holds up through the prism of passed years and moderate maturity – going back and rereading it remains the same mind-bending pleasure that it was when I was fifteen. Not only is it – a rarity in the subgenre – genuinely well written, but it does what fantastical writing is truly meant to: it comments on our world today, in a way that would otherwise be impossible. The power of names and naming stuck with me, and if there’s a reason why I today refuse to spell Ashkhabad “Ashgabat” Kay may very well have something to do with it.

Making Scenes by Adrienne Eisen

The basic willingness to describe modern life’s brutality – from lists of food consumed and bulimiacally purged, to the absurdity of what passes today for courtship – sets Eisen apart; her willingness to describe without going somewhere is also laudable. Reading Making Scenes is an experience closest to voyeuristically watching that cute neighbor across the hallway, except that she has begun to leave audiotapes on your doorstep of her – just as you suspected – far too aware and intelligent inner monologue. This voice sticks around.

Demons by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

By and large, Dostoyevsky doesn’t do plot: throughout his works, there are simply long periods of hysterics and contemplation, generally circling around a heinous crime committed in the very beginning of the work. Demons is no different in this respect, but here the hysterics come first, and then the crimes – a set-up that avoids the disappointment with which both Brothers Karamazov and Crime and Punishment end, and one that provides much more space for the author to develop his characters’ private insanities. And when it comes to madness, Dostoyevsky simply has no equivalent.

Isaac Scarborough is a writer living in Kazakhstan.

Sarah LaBrie

The Quick and the Dead by Joy Williams

A manifesto for young women destined to spend adulthood in a dimension just to the left of reality, the result of not having solidified quite correctly as children. The three teenaged orphans who guide us through Williams’ strange desert are peculiar but not precious, compelling in their very anti-Amelieness. It’s okay to be a genuine girl wacko, Williams tells us: if you’re smart enough to own it, you still get to win.

Autobiography of Red by Anne Carson

Fiction writers who start out as poets have an edge when it comes to building faultless sentences. Carson, a Classicist by trade, applies her skills as a translator of Greek verse to a novel about a monster named Geryon and his arrogant sometimes-boyfriend, Herakles. Building loosely on fragments of a poem by Stesichorus, Carson winds together scholarship and brutal wit to build a discomfitingly relatable love story.

The Counterlife by Philip Roth

In the autobiographical note that begins Notes of a Native Son, James Baldwin discusses coming to the conclusion that, before he could produce anything else of substance, he had to write about what it meant to be black. Through the lens of Nathan Zuckerman, Roth offers a metafictional take on the same question as it relates to Judaism while experimenting with perspective, structure, time and form. Probably the most skillfully written examination out there on the bond between fiction writing and the desire for control.

Sarah LaBrie is a writer living in Los Angeles. You can find her website here.

Daniel D'Addario

England, England by Julian Barnes

In college, one of my mistakes was taking a class on comparative literature, after which I was left thinking that Britain or America could never produce a homegrown “national allegory.” Was I ever wrong! England’s image of itself is grist for this bizarre novel of ideas in which the nation is reassembled as a giant theme park for tourists—with a false king and queen and every famous Briton brought back to life. The novel questions the value of history and of myth—and despite its scorched-earth ending and brilliant dissection of the corporate profit motive, it does so with a bit of affection.

On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan

Including Kazuo Ishiguro’s cloistered-England novel The Remains of the Day in my three favorites here felt a little unfair; it’s like being asked to choose among your children, when one is an ultra-sensitive genius. Instead I chose to include the instance in which Ian McEwan, predominantly a creator of tight narrative schemes, most closely approaches Ishiguro’s sensitivity to context (a past era’s very Britishness) and to character. For not the first but the most exhilarating time, McEwan’s games have real consequence: the fate of a young marriage.

Morvern Callar by Alan Warner

Novels with inert protagonists slay me, like Mary Gaitskill’s books, or Updike’s Rabbit series: watching things happen around characters is somehow more exciting and lifelike than watching characters conquer situations themselves (with the author’s help). The protagonist, the amoral Scottish girl Morvern, is glamorously inert; things happen around her as she observes and calculates. The scene in which Morvern, unmoved, lights a Silk Cut cigarette while staring at her boyfriend’s corpse is choked with an ennui Camus would envy.

Daniel D'Addario is a writer for The New York Observer. You can find his website here.

Elisabeth Donnelly

Another Bullshit Night in Suck City by Nick Flynn

Nick Flynn was a poet, and a good one, before he was a memoirist (shades of Denis Johnson), which is why his raw recounting of a fragile family stings with moments of sharp beauty and heartbreaking empathy. The plotline is relatively simple; when Flynn was 27 and working at the Pine Street Inn, a homeless shelter in Boston, he comes into contact with his long lost father. The book is elliptical and non-linear, echoing Flynn’s memory, diving into blood and family legacy, Flynn’s father’s delusions of grandeur and his mother’s suicide, homelessness, forgotten people, the way cities and vice can chew you up, and the burden of the past on Flynn’s own life. It will knock you on your ass.

Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

The thing that sticks in my mind about Ralph Ellison’s masterpiece is that it’s so… weird. The imagery that he uses to describe the cruelty of this world is unforgettable: the nameless protagonist in his basement with 1,369 lightbulbs, the Black youths forced to fight for gold coins on an electrocuted rug, the riot (and spear) that rips through Harlem thanks to the Invisible Man’s gift of speech. While the book is ostensibly a record of growing up Black in a divided America, Ellison defies expectations at every turn, putting his character through scenes that are consistently strange and always feeling new (which left a legacy extending from John Cheever’s short stories to Paul Beatty’s The White Boy Shuffle); and this surprise means that Ellison can cut sharply with the anger, satire, and moody magnificence that’s fueling his work.

The Dud Avocado by Elaine Dundy

In the category of smart-girl-coming-of-age novels, Elaine Dundy’s American girl in Paris farce is particularly delicious. You’re in good hands with Dundy, after all, her biography was called Life Itself! (yes, with the exclamation point). The semi-autobiographical adventures of Sally Jay Gorce follow her as she dates, fucks, quips, and somehow makes a bad art film in the French countryside. It’s hilarious, and by the story’s end, proto-feminist Sally Jay is like a friend you don’t want to leave.

Elisabeth Donnelly is a writer living in New York. You can find her website here.

Lydia Brotherton

Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh

I was late to the Brideshead party – I only read it a couple years ago — but now I’m one of those people who owns the entire Granada miniseries and sort of goes on about gillyflowers and plover’s eggs too much. I can’t help it, and I’m not sure I can explain it without embarrassing myself: I really love this novel.

Orlando: A Biography by Virginia Woolf

When I first read Orlando, I was confused by its weirdness and delighted by its casually historical imaginings (there is absolutely no way to read fiction involving Elizabeth I that isn’t tacky except for this). And although I haven’t reread it in a while, I remember and misremember it like a tricky, particularly good dream. Maybe if there were an umami taste of novels, Orlando would be it.

Chéri by Colette

One of the reasons I like reading Colette novels is that in addition to being evocative of summer holidays in France I’ve never had, they have the potential to read as little lyrical self-help books. To be honest, what actually happens in Chéri is less important than the life lessons I manage to project onto all that description of pale, beribboned wrists and afternoon weather: how to wear silk robes during the day and take up with younger men, why it’s nice to upholster your furniture in dove-gray velvet, and — maybe most importantly—how to grow older, and, in your increasing age, more glamorous, demanding.

Lydia Brotherton is a soprano living in Basel, Switzerland. You can find her website here.

Brian DeLeeuw

House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski

"Favorite novels" is a slippery idea. Favorite when? When I read it? Now, years later, in the memory of reading? I’m not sure I would even finish Danielewski’s novel today (this is saying something bad about me, not the novel), but its blending of pulpy horror and deconstructionist theory felt custom designed for where my head was at ten years ago, in the middle of college. I’ve never in my life been as consumed by the experience of reading a book. Probably I should try to read it again.

American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis

One of the ways a satire can be judged successful is if a lot of people don’t understand that it’s satire. Another is if a lot of these same people get very exercised and moved to protest and write angry and self-righteous ad hominem reviews. American Psycho passes both tests. If there remain any doubters (after talking to some of my friends, I know they’re out there), the fact that Mary Harron directed the movie adaptation should be proof enough. This is the funniest book I’ve ever read, which makes it puzzling why much of Ellis’s other work is so unfunny and sometimes plain bad.

Veronica by Mary Gaitskill

Mary Gaitskill writes about complicated and uncomfortable emotional states with more precision and cold elegance than anybody else I have read. She’s most known for doing this in her short stories, and in some structural ways Veronica feels like a very long story rather than a novel. But those sort of classifications are irrelevant here. The book spares no one, least of all the reader. The prose itself is a representation of one of the novel’s central ideas: beauty is cruel, but no less beautiful because of it.

Brian DeLeeuw is a writer living in New York. He is the associate editor of Tin House and the author of the novel In This Way I Was Saved. You can find his website here.

digg delicious reddit stumble facebook twitter subscribe

Our Novels, Ourselves

Part One (Tess Lynch, Karina Wolf, Elizabeth Gumport, Sarah LaBrie, Isaac Scarborough, Daniel D'Addario, Elisabeth Donnelly, Lydia Brotherton, Brian DeLeeuw)

Part Two (Alice Gregory, Jason Zuzga, Andrew Zornoza, Morgan Clendaniel, Jane Hu, Ben Yaster, Barbara Galletly, Elena Schilder, Almie Rose)

Part Three (Alexis Okeowo, Benjamin Hale, Robert Rutherford, Kara VanderBijl, Damian Weber, Jessica Ferri, Britt Julious, Letizia Rossi, Will Hubbard, Durga Chew-Bose, Rachel Syme, Amanda McCleod, Yvonne Georgina Puig)

The 100 Greatest Novels

If You're Not Reading You Should Be Writing And Vice Versa, Here Is How

Part One (Joyce Carol Oates, Gene Wolfe, Philip Levine, Thomas Pynchon, Gertrude Stein, Eudora Welty, Don DeLillo, Anton Chekhov, Mavis Gallant, Stanley Elkin)

Part Two (James Baldwin, Henry Miller, Toni Morrison, Kurt Vonnegut Jr., Margaret Atwood, Gertrude Stein, Vladimir Nabokov)

Part Three (W. Somerset Maugham, Langston Hughes, Marguerite Duras, George Orwell, John Ashbery, Susan Sontag, Robert Creeley, John Steinbeck)

Part Four (Flannery O'Connor, Charles Baxter, Joan Didion, William Butler Yeats, Lyn Hejinian, Jean Cocteau, Francine du Plessix Gray, Roberto Bolano)

References (113)

References allow you to track sources for this article, as well as articles that were written in response to this article.
  • Response
    End Protesting and complaining And Commence your own men Email campaign Alternatively
  • Response
    Football is actually 1 of the largest sports in America. It has a big following.
  • Response
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: uggs
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: longchamp outlet
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Is downloading a copyright content through rapidshare & megaupload is illegal in uk?
  • Response
    Response: american bullion
    I wonder why those servers with copyrighted content stay up. I see a lot of "don't post any US content" but they don't care at all about content from japan.. . Is it just that Japan doesn't care much about their copyright laws?. . It is hundreds or maybe even thousands ...
  • Response
    I want to start a blog on myyearbook but i cant find the box on my profile.. I have made sure i have checked the box to show my latest blog in the manage profile boxes section.. But it still wont show up.. Please help.. Is there any other way to ...
  • Response
    Response: roll over
    i'm not used to the new Yahoo! Pulse that comes with your email. i like blogging though...and i don't know how to change the blog settings to make your posts invisible to everyone except you and stuff. help please DX.
  • Response
    Response: ira
    Everyone says you can't move a primary Tumlbr blog without deleting the account, but what about a secondary blog? I have two accounts, one that I use and one that I just started. I don't use the primary blog on the old one, but I do use a secondary blog on ...
  • Response
    Response: silver in ira
    I am new to blog subscriptions and I am looking for an easy reader that is nice and organized that lets me view my blogs from my homepage or has a little scrollbox that is always up on the side of the computer screen. I started to use bloglines but it ...
  • Response
    Response: slv
    Is a URL for copyrighted web content also covered by the copyright?
  • Response
    How do I copyright the title and the content of an international online newspaper?
  • Response
    Response: medicine
    I am struggling with this problem, unknowingly i started importing other person blog posts..............which i want to disable. Please help me out.
  • Response
    How do you add more than one image per post to blogspot?
  • Response
    How do I find someones blogger blogs with their email address?
  • Response
    Response: Jasa SEO
  • Response
    I understand how to use Banners in Joomla, but the banners are not displaying. How do I choose where the banners show up? I see no option for that. Its published..
  • Response
    How do you start a website for a clothing company?
  • Response
    In other words, how do i search for blogs that fit what I want to read about? Does anyone know how to BROWSE through blogs by subject or whatever on blogger?.
  • Response
    Response: March madness 2014
    For the "letter to the editor," can one send his/her blog post to the editor. The instructions say: "Letters to the editor should only be sent to The Times, and not to other publications. We do not publish open letters or third-party letters.". . Does that mean blog posts, too?. . ...
  • Response
    Response: additional reading
    I have just gotten a blog on blogspot. People comment me and I was wondering how you comment back to them without e-mailing or going to their blog. .
  • Response
    I'll be teaching a creative writing class this summer to a group of 11-14 year-olds. I have experience teaching writing (mostly poetry) to adults, but teaching kids will be new territory. Does anyone have some great tips, websites, resources for exercises, and reading materials for this age group? Thanks!.
  • Response
    Response: yacon root
    Please answer both questions completely:. . What's the easiest way to make sure that if I copyright something, that it's mine without have to copyright each article or blog individually?. . ALSO: . . I'm a poet and I want to copyright my work without have to pay "per poem" - ...
  • Response
    Response: no title
    I want to do a live webcast, but I can't figure out how to do it on the Blogger platform. Can anyone give me some direction?. . Thanks!.
  • Response
    Response: Roofers Dublin
    I have to write about two pages for creative writing. Do you have any ideas that I could use, or a topic for by paper? Thank you!.
  • Response
    I never thought of it that way, well put!
  • Response
    How do I start a website? I know that I have to buy a domain or something like that?
  • Response
    How do i forward my blogspot account to my website domain name?
  • Response
    Response: go now
    I am not experienced with joomla but I want to use to make a website. My only trouble right now is getting it installed on Yahoo hosting I don't know what to do.. . Can anyone direct me to a site or forum for this or tell me how do it? ...
  • Response
    Response: extra resources
    And I HAVE read wordpress support page. Just want to know, if my files over 3GB will be deleted if I will not extend my upgrade for another 12 months..
  • Response
    I have two computers: I call one the "good" computer -- it has two monitors. The other is my "junk" computer with one screen where I download a lot of stuff to it.. . If I wanted to continue using both computers but only with the dual monitors, what would I ...
  • Response
    okay so i downloaded firefox. i've been using firefox for a while, and all a sudden when i x'ed out my firefox and opened it again it wont go to websites, it wont even say page not displayed. it will just be blank. so i unstalled it and re stalled it ...
  • Response
    How do IE and Firefox make money? Where is the revenue source coming in from?
  • Response
    Response: get more
    I know that there are countless plug-ins designed to make the comments do-follow, but I'm looking for something that will make the links in the blog-posts themselves do-follow. Please include a link or detailed instructions on how to do this. Thanks!. Do you have any examples of themes that you know ...
  • Response
    I was watching the episode of Ugly Betty where she started a blog.. . I've always wanted to have a blog (that people would actually read!) and I have some great ideas for some but how do i actually start one on the internet?. . Help much appreciated..
  • Response
    I am trying to find a good blogging site where I can actually get viewers or readers to view my blog. I have tried blogspot and live journal with no real success. Does anyone know of any good sites where I can actually blog and get readers?. . Another thing is ...
  • Response
    Response: prev
    What are some good wordpress themes/plugins that allow you to manipulate design?
  • Response
    i know you write in it but what else?. what are some good websites to start a blog and what topics should i do?.
  • Response
    Response: your input here
    I would like to be a creative writing professor, but I can no find out exactly what they do. I love to write, and to help other people become better writers, so that is why I want to become a creative writing/english professor. Does this fit with the profession? What is ...
  • Response
    I'm trying to find out what the most popular blogs are when it comes to news and views and cell phone stuff..
  • Response
    Response: you could try here
    Ok so I have looked around a lot on this matter and I keep finding stuff like VNC (or VNSea) that allows you to access the computers on your WiFi network, but all of these require you to install something onto the computer itself. Is there a way to access the ...
  • Response
    Response: sr-22
    I was thinking of publishing or posting online some of my articles I've written for school but can't afford to copyright them. If they are in my school paper, do I hold any ownership over them or are they protected by law?.
  • Response
    I'll be teaching a creative writing class this summer to a group of 11-14 year-olds. I have experience teaching writing (mostly poetry) to adults, but teaching kids will be new territory. Does anyone have some great tips, websites, resources for exercises, and reading materials for this age group? Thanks!.
  • Response
    It used to show at the top of my start list until I downloaded google chrome to see what it was all about, I didn't really like it so I deleted it but now firefox isnt at the top of start. Any ideas?.
  • Response
    Response: my sources
    okay so i downloaded firefox. i've been using firefox for a while, and all a sudden when i x'ed out my firefox and opened it again it wont go to websites, it wont even say page not displayed. it will just be blank. so i unstalled it and re stalled it ...
  • Response
    What is the default username and password for Joomla Stand Alone Server?
  • Response
    Hi. I have a blog which i installed wordpress. So far so good. Except that wordpress stats shows me the visits and i want it to show how many visitors visited my blog. Can anyone help me? Thanks a lot..
  • Response
    I live in Costa Rica and am about to publish a community newspaper, what are the steps to go about copyrighting the name and articles published in it? And also when can one start using the copyright symbol?.
  • Response
    Response: dasuquin large
    What do people think would be a good blog hosting website for creating a blog on? There are a lot I think so I don't know which would be most useful and versatile..
  • Response
    It didn't used to, the Specs are Nvidia 5500gt, 1gb RAM, so on, I know it's not the latest computer out there, it's mostly for playing very old games or surfing the internet. The computer automatically restarts at the beginning of a streaming video, it doesn't even try to run it. ...
  • Response
    Columbia University has a new creative writing major and on the application instructions, it says that anyone pursuing anything in the creative or visual arts may submit a supplement to their application. Creative writing is specifically listed, however, I am not sure what to submit. . . Would they accept a ...
  • Response
    How can I get a blogger to remove a defammatory post on a blog?
  • Response
    Response: try this out
    How do you start a blog? How do you get your own blog site or page?
  • Response
    Response: Sarpits Blog
    Basically, I want it to be on the main page where all of my posts go but then I also want to be able to put it on a separate page of my blog dedicated to only that subject. Hopefully this makes sense!.
  • Response
    I am helping some friends get their shop on the map and noticed. They have a web site. One of the ways in my research to optimize a web site is to use a blog. I am not blog savvy and neither are they so need a little help as to ...
  • Response
    Response: 60 Day Guarantee
    I wanted to start my own blog and I was looking for your suggestions for which sites you think are the best to start one with. . I want to be able to post pictures, text, and music (maybe).. I only want to use a free blog host..
  • Response
    Response: try this web-site
    How can I best copyright protect stories and articles on my writing website? I know you can insert a copyright symbol, but can this COMPLETELY protect against somebody copying and pasting your stuff and claiming that it is theirs?.
  • Response
    Response: home
    I want it easy to change template colors; a gallery area; calendar and of course the blogging area should be easy to manage/update. Names and links would be greatly appreciated..
  • Response
    Response: consultor seo
    go here for greatest seo españa around
  • Response
    I would like to change my blogger archive frequency from 1 month to longer, like 3 months. How do I do this?.
  • Response
    Response: wonderful team
    How do i get rid of undefined in blog posts?
  • Response
    Response: Cabinet Nexus Tips
    I'm looking for some really good business blogs to add to my google reader that are worthwhile following on an ongoing basis. Can you make and recommendations? I have Seth Godin's already. Thanks!. . It would also be helpful if you told me why you liked these blogs..
  • Response
    おもさ たり しゅみ じゅうはちにち は 痒い です. つよい サマンサタバサ グッチ 財布 定期入れ も め を かみ です ぜ. 非常に グッチキーホルダー も 饺子 です か. しやくしょ は カレー です さ. グッチ アウトレット ううん、そうじゃない 歌 を 発つ でございます. おもちゃ か 用品 かようび ウルグァイ に 盛ん な 釣り です. ひょう や ひさしぶり にじゅうににち 西南 ...
  • Response
    Response: great site
    New to joomla please guide me i have download joomla from website ? What should i do ?.
  • Response
    Response: pizza hut coupons
    If you like reading a blog, what kind of interesting things that make you like that blog? Give me your favorite blog links too..
  • Response
    I know that there are countless plug-ins designed to make the comments do-follow, but I'm looking for something that will make the links in the blog-posts themselves do-follow. Please include a link or detailed instructions on how to do this. Thanks!. Do you have any examples of themes that you know ...
  • Response
    As I look at the major courses for both it seems that I can take screen writing and film courses as my general major elective as a English major. When I choose a minor which can be creative writing or film studies, I'm having a hard time because I want to ...
  • Response
    see here for best dog arthritis care around
  • Response
    Response: business care
    I have a website idea that i know will make me money, i just don't know what to do and where to start..
  • Response
    Response: experto en seo
    click here for greatest posicionamiento web seo around
  • Response
    get greatest servicios seo anywhere
  • Response
    I have a wordpress blog and I would like to remove everything (it's hosted on my own domain and hosting) because I would like to delete my site. How can I save my blog posts in a folder or something in my documents (offline) because I don't want to delete everything ...
  • Response
    go here for best dog arthritis symptoms available
  • Response
    Response: website here
    I have a weird desire now to make a false blog. What is a good blog site to do this and let people know that its not really my thoughts but of my characters thoughts?.
  • Response
    Response: dogs and arthritis
    get greatest signs of dog with arthritis available
  • Response
    The best canine arthritis available
  • Response
    I like how I can ask questions on here and get pretty much instant feedback, however I kind of want to be able to just share my general thoughts and ideas and have people comment on them. Does anyone know of a blogging site that could offer me this luxury? Oh, ...
  • Response
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    I found a great...
  • Response
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: milf dating
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    I found a great...
  • Response
    Response: Saleh Stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: saleh stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: Saleh Stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: Saleh Stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: Saleh Stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: Saleh Stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: Saleh Stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: Saleh Stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: Saleh Stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: Saleh Stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: Saleh Stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: Saleh Stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: Saleh Stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: Saleh Stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: Saleh Stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: saleh stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: Saleh Stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording
  • Response
    Response: Saleh Stevens
    In Which We Develop A Radiant New Love For Literature - Home - This Recording

Reader Comments (2)

<div>Adgangskode ansøgning giver forkerte info for svindlere</div>
<div>IDG News Service - Tysklands Fraunhofer <a href="http://www.levis501dk.com/">levis 501</a>
Institute for Secure informationsteknologi sælger en mobiltelefon program, der tilbyder en roman funktion over andre adgangskode-opbevaring programmer. Programmet, MobileSitter, vil gemme adgangskoder, PIN-koder (personlige identifikationsnumre) og Tan (transaktion godkendelse tal). Disse hemmelige koder er krypteret og derefter afsløret <a href="http://www.levisjeansuk.com/">levis jeans uk</a>
ved at angive en hoved-adgangskode. Fare med opbevaring af adgangskoder i sådanne programmer er <a href="http://www.leviscommuterjeans.com/">levis commuter jeans</a>
metoder en hacker kan bruge til at få master adgangskoden. Hackere kan forsøge brute force eller ordbogsangreb, hvor forskellige adgangskoder er gentagne gange forsøgt ved hjælp af automatiserede programmer, sagde Rachid <a href="http://www.jeanlevis501.com/">levis 501 jeans</a>
El Khayari, en forskningsstipendiat i sikker mobile systemer på Fraunhofer. Nogle adgangskode oplagring programmer ikke begrænse antallet gange adgangskoder kan indtastes, sagde han. MobileSitter, vil dog altid returnere et svar uanset hvilken master adgangskode er indtastet. Hvis dit betalingskort PIN "5555", men en forkert master password indtastes, vil MobileSitter dekryptere en værdi baseret på forkerte adgangskoden, såsom "8901." "Det ikke besvare spørgsmålet om, hvorvidt hoved-adgangskoden er rigtigt eller forkert," sagde El Khayari. Angriberne ville ved den returnerede værdi er forkert, indtil de forsøgte at bruge kortet. Hvis hackeren fremstillet ofrets betalingskort og forsøgte at hæve kontanter men gentagne gange indtastes en forkert PIN-kode, beslaglægge ATM maskiner typisk kortet, efter et par forsøg. Den autoriserede bruger af MobileSitter kan også definere regler for hvordan visse oplysninger returneres. For eksempel sagt kan oprettes en regel til udelukkende returnere 4-cifret PINs, når disse oplysninger er anmodet om, så en hacker vil tro, de har opnået en pinkode snarere end nogle andre hemmelige kode, El Khayari. "Når du beder om en PIN-kode, og det viser du bogstaver, du ved, det ikke er rigtigt," sagde El Khayari. Hvad sker der, hvis Mobilesitters autoriserede brugeren indtaster forkert hovedadgangskoden? MobileSitter vil vise et ikon, såsom en rød stjerne, som brugeren har plukket, når de oprettet deres master password. Hvis forkerte hoved-adgangskoden er angivet, vil brugeren se et forkert ikon og ved for at prøve igen. Hackeren vil ikke kende det rette ikon. Fraunhofer sælger direkte MobileSitter til €9.90 (US$ 13.45) fra sit websted, selvom forskning organisationen normalt licenser sine teknologi, sagt El Khayari. Det har også et program, hvorved selskaber kan købe programmet, lægge deres logoet på startbilledet og give det til deres kunder. Fraunhofer tilbyder også en licens til fabrikanter til at forudinstallere</div>
May 9, 2012 | Unregistered Commenterxiaoying
Demons is my favorite novel of all-time, and I was delighted to see it listed here -- I truly was. But it is an absolute absurdity to say that "Dostoevsky doesn't do plot" and that Demons has no plot. In fact, the diametric opposite it true: Demons is a masterpiece of plot-theme integration -- it's one of the many things that makes it such a great novel -- and to not grasp this is to disclose in full a non-understanding of what plot actually is: i.e. a progressive sequence of interconnected events which culminate in climax.

Theme, corollarily, is the core meaning that those events add up to.

http://journalpulp.com/2012/03/04/top-ten-best-novels-youve-never-heard-of/
June 17, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterRay

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
All HTML will be escaped. Hyperlinks will be created for URLs automatically.